space banner6

SCAR General News

Antarctic squid Darren StevensA new review, titled "A review of Southern Ocean squids using nets and beaks", by Dr Yves Cherel has been published in Marine Biodiversity and will be of interested to the Antarctic research community.
Dr Cherel was a 2017 SCAR Visiting Scholar recipient, where he worked on the project "Training curators and biologists in dealing with Southern Ocean cephalopod beaks, establishing reference collection and a series of seminars and public talks." He also co-authored the Crustacean Guide for Predator Studies in the Southern Ocean.

The review presents an innovative approach to investigate the teuthofauna from the Southern Ocean by combining two complementary data sets, the literature on cephalopod taxonomy and biogeography, together with predator dietary investigations. Sixty squids were recorded south of the Subtropical Front, including one circumpolar Antarctic (Psychroteuthis glacialis Thiele, 1920), 13 circumpolar Southern Ocean, 20 circumpolar subantarctic, eight regional subantarctic, and 12 occasional subantarctic species. A critical evaluation removed five species from the list, and one species has an unknown taxonomic status. The 42 Southern Ocean squids belong to three large taxonomic units, bathyteuthoids (n = 1 species), myopsids (n = 1), and oegopsids (n = 40). A high level of endemism (21 species, 50%, all oegopsids) characterizes the Southern Ocean teuthofauna. Seventeen families of oegopsids are represented, with three dominating families, onychoteuthids (seven species, five endemics), ommastrephids (six species, three endemics), and cranchiids (five species, three endemics). Recent improvements in beak identification and taxonomy allowed making new correspondence between beak and species names, such as Galiteuthis suhmi (Hoyle 1886), Liguriella podophtalma Issel, 1908, and the recently described Taonius notalia Evans, in prep. Gonatus phoebetriae beaks were synonymized with those of Gonatopsis octopedatus Sasaki, 1920, thus increasing significantly the number of records and detailing the circumpolar distribution of this rarely caught Southern Ocean squid. The review extends considerably the number of species, including endemics, recorded from the Southern Ocean, but it also highlights that the corresponding species to two well-described beaks (Moroteuthopsis sp. B and Psychroteuthis sp. B) are still unknown.

Reference: 
Cherel, Yves. A review of Southern Ocean squids using nets and beaks. Marine Biodiversity 50, 98 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12526-020-01113-4